Sports

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NASCAR bans flag from races, venues

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For more than 70 years, the Confederate flag was a common and complicated sight at NASCAR races. Through the civil rights era right on through the season opener at Daytona in February, the flag dotted infield campsites and was waved in grandstands by fans young and old. As the nation — and at last, NASCAR — comes to grips with race relations in the wake of the death of George Floyd, it was time: The flag is no longer welcome in the stock car series.
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IN THIS SEPT. 10, 2015

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IN THIS SEPT. 10, 2015, file photo, workers clean the empty stands in Arthur Ashe Stadium after the women’s semifinal matches were postponed because of rain at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. When he first contemplated the prospect of a U.S. Open without fans because of the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Tennis Association’s chief revenue officer figured there was no way it could work. Lew Sherr eventually came around to embracing the idea of a closed-door Grand Slam tournament -- if it’s held at all; a decision is expected in the next two weeks -- because it still could make money even if millions were forfeited with zero on-site receipts from tickets, hospitality, food and beverage or merchandise sales. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
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Looking back on past NCAA scandals

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Last week the NCAA handed down a suspension for Oklahoma State’s basketball program. Some OSU fans I know expressed anger at the NCAA for its action. One of the comments I heard was that the ones being hurt the most by the ruling are the current coaches and players — not necessarily the ones responsible for the misdeed. While I can’t claim to know much about the situation, I would tend to agree with that thought. That’s usually the case in NCAA rulings. The ones affected the most are almost always innocent bystanders.